Skills and fundamentals

Although size, power, and speed are desirable to players, the fundamental skills of the game can be learned and honed only with practice. Many slower or smaller players excel at mastering blocking, tackling, kicking, running, passing, or catching.

Approach.

In tackle, the body and arms of a defensive player are used to bring the ball carrier to the ground or to stop the carrier's advance. In a tackle from the front, the tackler hits the opponent with his shoulder a few inches above the opponent's knees, at the same time wraps both arms around and lifts the opponent, and then pushes the opponent to the ground. Many times the tackle is made from the side or by grabbing a ball carrier by the arm or leg as the carrier runs past. Sometimes it takes more than one tackler to stop a powerful ball carrier. If so, the effective way to shoot down the carrier or stop the carrier's advance is for one tackler to hit the tall player and the other short.

Running with the ball.

When running with the ball, the main consideration is to gain yards and avoid losing the ball or having the ball stolen. The ball carrier protects the ball by placing the palm of the hand around the front of the ball and tucking it against his side, with the elbow firmly resting against it. The ball should be carried on the arm away from a potential tackler whenever possible, releasing the other arm to protect against tacklers (arm straight). Runners follow the paths opened by their blockers, changing direction rapidly, changing pace, and cutting their way through opponents to gain yards.

He passed.

Passing or throwing the ball is one of the most difficult skills in soccer. The quarterback throws almost every pass in standard offensive systems. Occasionally, a runner or defender throws a pass after feinting on a running play; generally such a pass is thrown on the run. On rare occasions, a finish, which falls to the backfield, will pitch.

To be legal, a pass must be thrown from behind the line of scrimmage. The passer catches the ball with four fingers through the laces; the thumb is extended. With the elbow forward and the ball held behind the ear, the passer releases the ball with a quick snap of the wrist. The ball should spiral, rather than advance from one end to the other, in order to move quickly through the air and be easy to catch. The short pass is often thrown by quarterbacks on the run. For a long pass, the passer should step back and bring one foot forward, making sure to follow with the body after releasing the ball.

Receipt of passes.

A pass receiver must have speed to traverse the field and be moody to escape opponents. A good sense of timing, knowing when the quarterback will throw the ball, is essential. A pass receiver must catch the ball on the fly in mid-air for a legal catch. He literally "looks at the ball into his hands", that is, he keeps his eyes on the ball until it is firmly in his grip. To make the actual catch, the receiver forms a pocket with his hands, palms facing out. Sometimes you may have to catch the ball with your chest or over your shoulder, while sprinting. Only after considerable practice between the passer and his receivers can a successful passing attack develop.

With recent technological advances, live soccer has added to the growing popularity of the game. People simply turn on their portable devices with Internet access and start watching live football. This has made watching soccer more convenient than ever. https://xn--l3caqb0aylm5a2a7gub1fxe.com/

Author's Bio: 

Sometimes you may have to catch the ball with your chest or over your shoulder, while sprinting. Only after considerable practice between the passer and his receivers can a successful passing attack develop.