The Apple iPad is an incredible device that is causing a sensation in the board game communities around the world, but why? What do traditional board games have to do with the iPad? Can physical games with many pieces be faithfully converted into a small touch screen device? Are these areas where the iPad is really better than the physical board game?

Despite what many hardcore board game enthusiasts may want to believe, the iPad is actually a great addition to the closet full of bits and pieces, "real life" physical board games. But it will never replace the physicists, just as it will never replace the experience of gathering around a table with 4 friends.

Screen size, at the moment, is the main limitation in the iPad gaming experience, but size is also an advantage. For example, the combination of the iPad, iPhone and Nintendo DS has completely destroyed the industry of "travel" games. We are no longer forced to play monopoly with small pieces that get lost in the seat back! Long trips with children are now much easier. However, the small screen means that it is not particularly suitable for placing in the center of a large table and sitting. An impressive attempt at small-scale coffee table games was Days of Wonder's "Small World" board game app, which includes a coffee table mode as well as the standard "pass and play" modes. In coffee table mode, the iPad would detect that it is positioned horizontally on a table and would automatically hold the board in a fixed position, with each player's interface area on the appropriate side of the screen. However, this style of play was limited to 2 players, as interface elements for more than 2 players simply did not fit on the screen. The "pass and play" mode is standard in almost all iPad board game conversions so far, allowing more players to swipe the device. In fact, "check and play" is the only possible way when the games include some element of secrecy regarding the players' cards: using the iPad to play poker with a friend sitting across from you is simply not possible with a single device. Obviously, with more than one iPad, we can achieve a somewhat similar experience in terms of gaming, but the social interaction would plummet: each player could also be looking at a computer screen.

Which brings us to the next point, one where iPads really do win at physical board games: the fact that physical games require physical players. A weekly gaming session is difficult to organize at best (scheduling conflicts, gaming preferences) can sometimes lead to an unsatisfactory gaming meeting. However, with an internet connection and an iPad, you can potentially play with people around the world who want to play the same game as you, at the same time that is convenient for you. Of course, the social interactions are not the same, but the overall gaming experience is. Carcassonne is arguably the best example yet of internet games made directly on the iPad. When you choose to play a game on the Internet, the application does not ask you for usernames, passwords, that you choose a lobby or game server, it only goes out to find you an opponent and gives you an estimated time. Sadly, most iPad board game conversions have yet to include an internet gaming option.

So far we've only talked about how the iPad can replace the physical versions, but I think they can also coexist and actually complement them. As I said, gathering a group of players can be difficult, so taking the time to explain a new game and try it out before playing "seriously" is a waste of time and a waste of time. The iPad is a great way to practice before the actual social game, to make sure you fully understand the rules and have an idea of ​​the strategies that could play against you. And even if you have real-life experience of the rules, the iPad is a great way to discover new styles of play that you may have never seen before; remember that most board game apps have artificial intelligence routines developed by the board game creators themselves. So they usually know a trick or two that your friends might not know. https://www.betway168s.com/

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Which brings us to the next point, one where iPads really do win at physical board games: the fact that physical games require physical players. A weekly gaming session is difficult to organize at best (scheduling conflicts, gaming preferences) can sometimes lead to an unsatisfactory gaming meeting. However, with an internet connection and an iPad, you can potentially play with people around the world who want to play the same game as you, at the same time that is convenient for you. Of course, the social interactions are not the same, but the overall gaming experience is. Carcassonne is arguably the best example yet of internet games made directly on the iPad. When you choose to play a game on the Internet, the application does not ask you for usernames, passwords, that you choose a lobby or game server, it only goes out to find you an opponent and gives you an estimated time. Sadly, most iPad board game conversions have yet to include an internet gaming option.