Walls are often used in interior design. They can also be used in landscaping. You can either build a landscaping wall to define an area or protect your privacy. A landscaping wall can also be used to retain soil after excavations, such as for a driveway or patio. They are also known as retaining walls in this case.

Retaining Walls: Problems

Retaining walls are more labor intensive than freestanding walls. Retained soil means they must support their weight and resist lateral forces. Sometimes, the soil may become saturated with water. This can lead to tremendous force, particularly in clay soils. To learn more about repairs, click here for retaining wall repairs Sunshine Coast online.

Special provisions should be made when building a retaining wall.

    • It should have "batter", which refers to the pitch of its body. So it leans towards the soil it is retaining.
    • Tie-backs and dead-man anchors are required to attach the wall to soil.
    • Drains should be placed behind the wall to drain excess water. This is to stop pressure building up and pushing against walls.
    • To support the wall, a footing is also necessary. This is a layer of rock or compacted soil. This is particularly important if soil has been broken down or frozen.

If there is not enough batter, or if the anchors are inadequate or missing, retaining walls can settle, tilt, and buckle. Pressure could be increased by tree roots. Weight of objects placed behind and on top of the wall (e.g. Pressure can also be increased by outbuildings or parked vehicles.

Wall Repair Options

Retaining walls made from stone, block, wood or concrete can start to lean. The homeowners have two options: either demolish the wall and excavate to reinstall drains or call a foundation repair specialist.

Professionals can quickly stabilize walls and sometimes even bring them back to their original position. Foundation repair companies use similar methods to fix foundation walls.

Anchoring a Retaining Wall

Foundation repair contractors love the use of helical anchors.

    • Helix-shaped blades are joined to steel shafts to create an anchor that looks like it is a large screw.
    • Walls are drilled to accommodate the blade's size. The hydraulic rotary equipment then drives the anchor through the walls and into the soil bank.
    • A threaded adaptor can be attached to the rod so that it extends beyond wall faces. The hole can then be repaired.
    • Secure the threaded rod by using a large nut, and a steel sheet.

After you have secured the anchors, the wall can now be stabilized. You can adjust the nuts to allow the wall to be moved back into its original location, depending on the circumstances. This is especially true if the wall is adjacent to your driveway.

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Retaining walls are more labor intensive than freestanding walls. Retained soil means they must support their weight and resist lateral forces. Sometimes, the soil may become saturated with water.