Mediocrity Is A Learned Habit

For most people the idea of having a good job, married with kids, drive a nice car, and retire after 30 years of service to a company is the American Dream. In retrospect it is for most Americans. After doing an evaluation of my own experiences and changing them for the better. Becoming aware of this fact is eye opening.

What people do day in and day out unconsciously is conform. Very simply put in the strangest secret in the world by Earl Nightingale. A case study of this was unofficially done while I was interacting with old friends on a social media platform. The question that I asked a few of them were, how are you doing? What have you been up to? The response was “ok…I could be better” I left it there. They went on more about what has been a turning point in their lives yet nothing has really changed.

My conclusion, to that was simple…some people change and some don’t. What I have noticed is why do people wait until they are too old, divorced, and too fed up with everyone else's failures, envying the success of others in a negative way then decide to start complaining.

Whatever the reasons are they didn't seem to make time for their own aspirations in the midst of all the chaos. This is identified as the comfort zone. In the comfort zone there are different elements that create a cushion for people to relax and become lackadaisical or most commonly used term for this type of behavior is "settling." Settling for less or for what you have already...being content.

By not allowing yourself to seek more based on what others may think,a lot of times religion; is not gratitude but a conditioning of the mind. We have all been told at some point by parents, friends and colleagues that real success is for the special elite of people that were exposed to opportunities.True enough,but plainly incorrect and plants a notion that you don't deserve success. There is a point where you do have to explore opportunities to find out what you will go all out for.

My point is basically that this behavior is learned and supported by negative emotions and disbelief. This explains why you will have lesser than the higher standard or below average performance. Below are the elements that support mediocre results.

Identifying Mediocrity Elements

Let's look into what some of the elements that support these factors.

NOTE: These are negative emotions

1. Fear
.
2. Anxiety

3. Distrust

4. Low Self Esteem

5. Envy

I will compare how these elements are parallel to unconscious self-defeating thoughts that keep you in a comfort zone of mediocrity. In the simplest way of putting it, picture your life now or someone that you know that this is affecting.

Fear-Not believing in your own ability to lead.

Anxiety-Manifesting your thought into physical form i.e.

(Hording, unsatisfactory relationships, poverty.)

Distrust-Letting someone discourage you by their tunnel vision (friend or family member that you normally interact with.) or Listening to what their problems are and negative energy.

Self Esteem-Using Food as an outlet for feeling good and other ailments.

Envy-Making negative comments on the success of others

How To Destroying Mediocrity

In order to destroy this self ailing sin is to change your thinking and surround yourself with people that are smarter or have more knowledge in an area you would like to pursue. Make sure that they have the same mindset as you and not only have a genuine interest in succeeding with minimal results. Changing your thinking is the key to conquering and destroying mediocrity and any other thing that may be stopping you from being successful. It is very important to do a self-evaluation and identify your strengths and focus on them.

Author's Bio: 

Father|Inspired Writer| Creator| Self improvement Entrepreneur using life lessons for greater perspective.

There are 3 rules that I encourage people to live by that changed my life.

1. Change The Way You Think

2. Make A Promise To Yourself And Keep It

3. Don’t Forget Rule #1

http://www.kasiphillips.com/mediocrity-is-a-learned-habit-part-1/