Based upon a persons GI [glycemic index] this low glycemic diet was developed to assist diabetics in the control of their blood sugar level and not as a weight loss tool - though due to the change of diet some people might lose a little weight.

What is GI?

The glycemic index - this is a tool developed specifically to monitor the levels of sugar in a persons blood. It can measure how 50 grams of a specific carbohydrate can increase ones blood sugar levels against a measured GI [the control for this GI is generally white bread or pure glucose].

When carbohydrates are digested, it usually changes into glucose and this can cause a temporary rise in a persons blood glucose level. By using the GI with its scale of 1 to 100 [100 being pure glucose] we can test the glucose level in our foods. High levels range between 70 to 100, moderate levels score between 56 and 70, while low ranges from 55 to 1. Potatoes generally have a high score in the GI while a chocolate bar could only be 55, note though, just because the GI score is high or low it doesn't mean that that particular food is healthier for you.

What to eat on this diet

Fresh fruit
Fresh vegetables
lean meat
legumes
and foods made with whole grains

What to avoid on this diet

Processed foods/baked goods
Snacks
Sugared drinks/juices
and many more sugary / sweet foods out there.

I must state here that it can be quite difficult and confusing trying to work out the glycemic level in all the different foods. You can start by reading the nutritional labels on the packaging, as some manufacturers do list the glycemic level on their labels. Or rather choose organic and unprocessed foods as these generally score lower on the GI than processed goods. A confusing example here is rice, this grain can be from 50 up to the early 90's with its glycemic levels, but all is not lost as there are quite a few books out there that could assist you with this quest.

A lot of diabetics can control their blood sugar levels by diet alone but many need to test their blood sugar daily and some even need to test it after each meal. This is to check if their blood sugar spiked or if it remained level and under control.

Remember - when starting a new diet, consult with your physician first.

Author's Bio: 

Candice is a full time author and loves to write about her interests. These include a variety of diets, be it for weight loss or for the benefit of ones health she puts pen to paper. She also loves shopping, bowling, beading, dabbles in the forex market and enjoys internet marketing. You can visit her at 22 Inch black rims to find the black rims you want.