Dogs are our link to paradise. They don't know evil or jealousy or discontent. To sit with a dog on a hillside on a glorious afternoon is to be back in Eden, where doing nothing was not boring – it was peace.

No one could have described the everlasting friendship bond between men and dogs better than the world famous Czech writer. There is no doubt that dogs are the men’s best friends, but some incidents make us believe this is not just a matter of friendship assome dogs go way beyond it.You must have witnessed, read or heard about dogs doing great services for their masters but have you ever heard about a dog being faithful to his master even after his master’s death?Let’s tell you an unbelievable but true story of a loyal dog!!

John Gray, a gardener by profession, moved to Accommodation Edinburgh in 1850 with his family and joined the police force as a night watchman. Gray had a pet dog named ‘Bobby’ who was a Skye Terrier breed and he used to take his dog along for company during his duty hours in long nights of summers and winters. John Gray died of tuberculosis in 1858 and was buried in GreyfriarsKirkyard, (the first Church constructed in Edinburgh following Reformation). As a matter loyalty and to the sheer surprise of Edinburgh residents, Bobbyrefused to leave John Gray’s grave after his burial and stayed there till his own death. Bobby went through the hardships of worst weather conditions including chilling wintery nights, rains, storms, haze and snowfalls for 14 years beside his master’s grave.

The dog had become a local celebrity with fame throughout the country and a number of people from other cities visited Edinburgh to witness the eternal faithfulness of Bobby, who was named Greyfriars’ Bobby after the church. Citizens of Edinburgh took great care of the dog, and Sir William Chambers (The Lord Provost of Edinburgh) paid for Bobby’s licence andarranged a brass collar for him, which is still on show in the Museum of Edinburgh.Bobby was buried beside his masterafter his death in 1872, but his memories will always remainalive in hearts ofall dog lovers and Edinburgh residents.

You can see Bobby’s statue on George IV Bridge opposite GreyfriarsKirkyard, if you are visiting Edinburgh. There are a number of Accommodation Apartments Edinburgh for tourists to stay in. comparatively more spacious and low priced than hotel rooms.

Author's Bio: 

John Gray, a gardener by profession, moved to Accommodation Edinburgh in 1850 with his family and joined the police force as a night watchman. Gray had a pet dog named ‘Bobby’ who was a Skye Terrier breed and he used to take his dog along for company during his duty hours in long nights of summers and winters. John Gray died of tuberculosis in 1858 and was buried in GreyfriarsKirkyard, (the first Church constructed in Edinburgh following Reformation).

You can see Bobby’s statue on George IV Bridge opposite GreyfriarsKirkyard, if you are visiting Edinburgh. There are a number of Accommodation Apartments Edinburgh for tourists to stay in. comparatively more spacious and low priced than hotel rooms.