Employers conduct interviews to meet the person behind the application or resume. It is his responsibility to hire not only the person with the right skills, but a person who can fit in with the rest of the organization and give him what he pays employees for.

The person who can best convince ...Employers conduct interviews to meet the person behind the application or resume. It is his responsibility to hire not only the person with the right skills, but a person who can fit in with the rest of the organization and give him what he pays employees for.

The person who can best convince the employer that he can fill his wants will get the job. Ex-offenders and Felons stand a better chance of getting jobs by understanding exactly what employers are looking for. From experience, I can tell you that aside from the skills to get the job done employers look for:

Communication Skills

The ability to get ideas across both verbally and in writing in a way that is easy to understand

Honesty/Integrity

The refusal to lie, steal or deceive regardless of circumstance

Strong work ethic

To be conscientious about doing a good job because you take pride in what you do

Teamwork skills

The ability to work well as part of a team to achieve a common goal

Interpersonal skills

The ability to understand and interact well with others

Self-motivation/initiative

A personal desire to set and achieve goals

Flexibility/Adaptability

The ability to adjust to change, think creatively and solve problems effectively and quickly. It also is the ability to work well with those who are different from you.

Dependability

Committed to arrive to work every day, on time, and ready to work

Positive Attitude

Demonstration of enthusiasm through words and actions

Keep these principles in mind as you think about answers to these questions you are likely to hear on your next interview.

Tell me about yourself. This is often the most difficult question because most people are unsure how to answer it. Think of your best qualities

What do you know about our company? It is a good idea to get some basic knowledge of the company.

Why do want to work here? He wants to get a feel for your motivations.

What are your biggest strengths? He is looking for some things about you that will work for him.

What is your biggest weakness? This is a tricky question that is used to weed out applicants. He is looking for honesty, but don’t put yourself down. Use some important weakness that has nothing to do with the job you are applying for.

Why did you leave your last job? Never say anything negative about former job or boss. It will make you look like a troublemaker. It’s ok to say that the job just didn’t work out.

I see you have been to prison. Tell me about that. This question may come up. Simply talk about how regretful you are about past mistakes and what you have learned from your experiences.

How much money are you looking for? This is another question that is used to weed out applicants. Only talk about money if someone offers you a job. Never mention a dollar figure. The best answer is, “I want as much as you can afford to pay me.”

Do you have any questions for me? Most people answer “no” to this question. Show your interest by asking questions about the company or job duties.

Understanding what employers are looking for will allow you to focus your answers around these principles. You must be able to relate your skills and attitudes to best fit the needs of the employer. Being able to do this in a confident manner will land you a job whether you are an ex-offender or not.

Author's Bio: 

Eric Mayo specializes in professional and personal development with special emphasis on life skills and job readiness training. Eric has over 20 years of corporate and educational experience which he uses to help people improve the quality of their lives.

Mr. Mayo has a degree in Business Administration from Seton Hall University where he was a standout member of both the Pirate football and wrestling teams. An author and lecturer, Eric is the author of the books, "From Jail to a Job", "The Teenager's Guide to Getting a Job" , "The Secret to Getting Better Grades", and has addressed, among others, the Congressional Black Caucus, and the Charles Hamilton Institute for Race and Justice of the Harvard School of Law. He is an active member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity and has spent his life committed to community empowerment.

Eric has been studying, learning, applying and executing the art of personal achievement and leadership throughout his career. It is truly his passion and his gift. He combines a straightforward approach and real-world perspective with a presentation style that is inspirational and motivational. His primary message is, "Independence through Self-Reliance."

You can as Eric a question about getting at job with a criminal record at How felons Can Get Jobs